Showing posts tagged children

"O Children" // Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds

This came to mind when I heard about the shooting earlier today. I’ve got nothing else to add because I’m too sad and angry right now.

brooklynmutt:

A moment of silence at a candlelight vigil outside the White House 

(via Photo by patcaldwell • Instagram)

(Reblogged from brooklynmutt)
(Reblogged from charliemielczarek)
united-nations:

The Office of the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict answers questions about UN work to address LRA operations. We hope this conversation will encourage people to learn all of the facts about the hundreds of thousands of children affected by conflict around the world.

How does the LRA recruit children and what is their role? 
Where is the LRA operating?
What are the aspirations of the LRA? 
What are other violations are committed against children by the LRA? 
What has the United Nations done to address the violations committed against children by the LRA? 
Why is a military action against the LRA risky? 
What can I do for the children affected by the LRA?

Report of the UN Secretary-General on the Lord’s Resistance Army-affected areas (November 2011, S/2011/693)
UNICEF has been working for decades to protect children from violence/abuse. But there’s still much to be done.

UNICEF: Video on The Paris Principles: agreement to end the use of children in war
UNICEF: More on child soliders

International Criminal Court on the Situation in Uganda
Find out if your country has signed the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in armed conflict.
Statement from Special Representative Ms. Radhika Coomaraswamy:

I am pleased to see such a lively discussion on an issue that is often under-reported. If people want to help, they can support programs for children—-who have escaped the LRA—-to rebuild their lives and their communities throughout Central Africa. Any military action against LRA should pay heed to the fact that Kony’s army is largely comprised of children.

united-nations:

The Office of the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict answers questions about UN work to address LRA operations. We hope this conversation will encourage people to learn all of the facts about the hundreds of thousands of children affected by conflict around the world.

How does the LRA recruit children and what is their role?

Where is the LRA operating?

What are the aspirations of the LRA?

What are other violations are committed against children by the LRA?

What has the United Nations done to address the violations committed against children by the LRA?

Why is a military action against the LRA risky?

What can I do for the children affected by the LRA?

Report of the UN Secretary-General on the Lord’s Resistance Army-affected areas (November 2011, S/2011/693)

UNICEF has been working for decades to protect children from violence/abuse. But there’s still much to be done.

UNICEF: Video on The Paris Principles: agreement to end the use of children in war

UNICEF: More on child soliders

International Criminal Court on the Situation in Uganda

Find out if your country has signed the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in armed conflict.

Statement from Special Representative Ms. Radhika Coomaraswamy:

I am pleased to see such a lively discussion on an issue that is often under-reported. If people want to help, they can support programs for children—-who have escaped the LRA—-to rebuild their lives and their communities throughout Central Africa. Any military action against LRA should pay heed to the fact that Kony’s army is largely comprised of children.

(Reblogged from united-nations)

mohandasgandhi:

Mali: Children work in deadly gold mines

At least 20,000 children work in Malian artisanal gold mines under extremely harsh and dangerous conditions, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The Malian government and international donors should take action to end child labor in artisanal mines, Human Rights Watch said. Artisanal miners rely on low-tech methods and often organize informally.

The 108-page report, “A Poisonous Mix: Child Labor, Mercury, and Artisanal Gold Mining in Mali,” reveals that children as young as six dig mining shafts, work underground, pull up heavy weights of ore, and carry, crush, and pan ore. Many children also work with mercury, a toxic substance, to separate the gold from the ore. Mercury attacks the central nervous system and is particularly harmful to children.

“These children literally risk life and limb”, said Juliane Kippenberg, senior children’s rights researcher at Human Rights Watch. “They carry loads heavier than their own weight, climb into unstable shafts, and touch and inhale mercury, one of the most toxic substances on earth.”

Of 33 child laborers interviewed by Human Rights Watch, 21 said that they suffered from regular pain in the back, head, neck, arms, or joints. Children also suffer from coughing and respiratory disease. One boy about six years old described the pain he felt when digging shafts with a pickaxe for hours on end. Another boy said that “everything hurts” when he comes home after a day’s work underground.

Most children work alongside their parents to supplement the little income adult miners get from selling gold to local traders. Other children migrate to the mines by themselves, and end up being exploited and abused by relatives or strangers who take their pay. Some girls are sexually abused or engage in sex work to survive. Children come to the mines from other parts of Mali, as well as from Guinea, Burkina Faso, and other neighboring countries.

[…]

Figures obtained by Human Rights Watch from the Malian Ministry of Mines put the amount of artisanally mined gold exported per year at around four metric tons, worth around US$218 million at November 2011 prices. Most of this gold is exported to Switzerland and the United Arab Emirates, Dubai in particular.

(Continue reading…)

(Reblogged from mohandasgandhi)
(Reblogged from )
(Reblogged from esthet)
crookedindifference:

Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape

An estimated 20,000 children were born of rapes that occurred during the  1994 Rwandan genocide. Fifteen years later, the mothers of these  children still face enormous challenges, not least of which is the  stigma of bearing and raising a child fathered by a Hutu militiaman.  Over the past three years, photographer Jonathan Torgovnik has made  repeated visits to Rwanda to document the stories of these women. The  portraits and testimonies featured in Intended Consequences offer  intensely personal and honest accounts of these survivors’ experiences  of the genocide, as well as their conflicted feelings about raising a  child who is a palpable reminder of horrors endured.

crookedindifference:

Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape

An estimated 20,000 children were born of rapes that occurred during the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Fifteen years later, the mothers of these children still face enormous challenges, not least of which is the stigma of bearing and raising a child fathered by a Hutu militiaman. Over the past three years, photographer Jonathan Torgovnik has made repeated visits to Rwanda to document the stories of these women. The portraits and testimonies featured in Intended Consequences offer intensely personal and honest accounts of these survivors’ experiences of the genocide, as well as their conflicted feelings about raising a child who is a palpable reminder of horrors endured.

(Source: rowchygogo)

(Reblogged from crookedindifference)

thenoobyorker:

Palestinian children’s artwork that was banned by MOCHA. The artwork depicted the Israeli assault during the 2008-09 Gaza conflict through the eyes of Palestinian youth.

View a few more pieces of art here.

(Reblogged from genericlatino)
(Reblogged from charliemielczarek)