Showing posts tagged america

“National Day of Mourning” plaque at the site of the historical monument Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts.

United American Indians of New England

(Source: socialismartnature)

(Reblogged from thesociologist)
(Reblogged from mohandasgandhi)
thenoobyorker:

political-linguaphile:

The latest issue of TIME featuring Jose Antonio Vargas, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist who over a year ago wrote an essay for The New York Times “coming out” as an undocumented immigrant. Vargas relates: 

I told of my journey of being sent from the Philippines to America at age 12 without knowing I didn’t have the right papers; graduating from college and working as a successful journalist; and relying on a support network of American citizens (my high school principal and high school superintendent among them) to get me through. But mine is just one story. So with the help of friends and supporters, I founded a campaign called Define American, to document the lives of the undocumented and harness the support of our allies around this very controversial and misunderstood issue.  
There are an estimated 11.5 million people like me in this country, human beings with stories as varied as America itself, yet lacking a legal claim to exist here. It’s an issue that touches people of all ethnicities and backgrounds: Latinos and Asians, blacks and whites. (And, yes, undocumented immigrants come from all sorts of countries like Israel, Nigeria and Germany.) It’s an issue that goes beyond election-year politics and transcends the limitations of our broken immigration system and the policies being written to address them.
Read more: http://ideas.time.com/2012/06/14/inside-the-world-of-the-illegal-immigrant/#ixzz1xnEd117S

I really recommend reading Vargas’ essay. It really lays out how not every immigrant has a choice. Mr. Vargas was brought here as a child, not knowing he didn’t have the proper documentation. A lot of children are brought into this country this way. They grow up just as American as anyone born here, and in my opinion, really are just as American as anyone born here.

Great job TIME.

thenoobyorker:

political-linguaphile:

The latest issue of TIME featuring Jose Antonio Vargas, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist who over a year ago wrote an essay for The New York Times “coming out” as an undocumented immigrant. Vargas relates: 

I told of my journey of being sent from the Philippines to America at age 12 without knowing I didn’t have the right papers; graduating from college and working as a successful journalist; and relying on a support network of American citizens (my high school principal and high school superintendent among them) to get me through. But mine is just one story. So with the help of friends and supporters, I founded a campaign called Define American, to document the lives of the undocumented and harness the support of our allies around this very controversial and misunderstood issue.  

There are an estimated 11.5 million people like me in this country, human beings with stories as varied as America itself, yet lacking a legal claim to exist here. It’s an issue that touches people of all ethnicities and backgrounds: Latinos and Asians, blacks and whites. (And, yes, undocumented immigrants come from all sorts of countries like Israel, Nigeria and Germany.) It’s an issue that goes beyond election-year politics and transcends the limitations of our broken immigration system and the policies being written to address them.

Read more: http://ideas.time.com/2012/06/14/inside-the-world-of-the-illegal-immigrant/#ixzz1xnEd117S

I really recommend reading Vargas’ essay. It really lays out how not every immigrant has a choice. Mr. Vargas was brought here as a child, not knowing he didn’t have the proper documentation. A lot of children are brought into this country this way. They grow up just as American as anyone born here, and in my opinion, really are just as American as anyone born here.

Great job TIME.

(Reblogged from genericlatino)

newyorker:

For the past twenty years, the documentary photographer Joseph Rodriguez has worked all over the world, but his most deeply intimate projects have been his portraits of American struggle. “My aim is to get to the core of violence in America,” Rodriguez told me. “Not just the physical violence against one another but the quiet violence of letting families fall apart, the violence of unemployment, the violence of our educational system, and the violence of segregation and isolation.” Click-through for a selection of images from Rodriguez’s work, now on display at Taller Boricuahttp://nyr.kr/LdtC3n

(Reblogged from newyorker)
(Reblogged from hushpoint)

climateadaptation:

Witness the death of American liberalism. Aging coastal states will be overwhelmed by conservative ideology very soon. Good luck America!

U.S. Teen Birthrates Are Down, But Still High in the Bible Belt

Teen birthrates are highest in Texas, Oklahoma, Mississippi, Arkansas, and New Mexico, with slightly lower concentrations in the neighboring states of Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Arizona. New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, and Massachusetts have the lowest rates of teen births.

What factors lie behind this geographic pattern? […]

Teenage births remain high in more religious states. The correlation between teenage birthrates and the percentage of adults who say they are “very religious” is considerable (.69). The 2009 study posited that attitudes toward contraception play a significant role, noting that “religious communities in the U.S. are more successful in discouraging the use of contraception among their teenagers than they are in discouraging sexual intercourse itself.”

Teen birthrates also hew closely to America’s political divide. They are substantially higher in conservative states that voted for McCain in 2008 (with a correlation of .65) and negatively correlated with states that voted for Obama (-.62).

Class plays a substantial role as well. Teen births are negatively associated with average state income (-.62), the share of the workforce in knowledge, professional, and creative class jobs (-.61), and especially with the share of adults who are college graduates (-.76). Conversely, teen birthrates are higher in more working class states (with a positive correlation of .58).

Read more at The Atlantic Cities.[Image: Centers for Disease Control]

(Reblogged from climateadaptation)
imano:

Calvin and Hobbes

imano:

Calvin and Hobbes

(Source: kraimn)

(Reblogged from thesociologist)

stayingunderground:

“We came, We saw, We destroyed, We forgot” by William Blum

An updated summary of the charming record of US foreign policy. Since the end of the Second World War, the United States of America has …

1. Attempted to overthrow more than 50 governments, most of which were democratically-elected.
2. Attempted to suppress a populist or nationalist movement in 20 countries.
3. Grossly interfered in democratic elections in at least 30 countries.
4. Dropped bombs on the people of more than 30 countries.
5. Attempted to assassinate more than 50 foreign leaders.

In total: Since 1945, the United States has carried out one or more of the above actions, on one or more occasions, in the following 69 countries (more than one-third of the countries of the world):

If you’re American and aren’t aware of why your government isn’t popular with the rest of the world here is why!

(Reblogged from jonathan-cunningham)

We’re all born wanting the freedom to imagine a better and more beautiful future. But modern America has become a place so drearily confining and predictable that it chokes the life out of that built-in desire. Everything from our pop culture to our economy to our politics feels oppressive and unresponsive. We see 10 million commercials a day, and every day is the same life-killing chase for money, money and more money; the only thing that changes from minute to minute is that every tick of the clock brings with it another space-age vendor dreaming up some new way to try to sell you something or reach into your pocket. The relentless sameness of the two-party political system is beginning to feel like a Jacob’s Ladder nightmare with no end; we’re entering another turn on the four-year merry-go-round, and the thought of having to try to get excited about yet another minor quadrennial shift in the direction of one or the other pole of alienating corporate full-of-shitness is enough to make anyone want to smash his own hand flat with a hammer.

If you think of it this way, Occupy Wall Street takes on another meaning. There’s no better symbol of the gloom and psychological repression of modern America than the banking system, a huge heartless machine that attaches itself to you at an early age, and from which there is no escape. You fail to receive a few past-due notices about a $19 payment you missed on that TV you bought at Circuit City, and next thing you know a collector has filed a judgment against you for $3,000 in fees and interest. Or maybe you wake up one morning and your car is gone, legally repossessed by Vulture Inc., the debt-buying firm that bought your loan on the Internet from Chase for two cents on the dollar. This is why people hate Wall Street. They hate it because the banks have made life for ordinary people a vicious tightrope act; you slip anywhere along the way, it’s 10,000 feet down into a vat of razor blades that you can never climb out of.

That, to me, is what Occupy Wall Street is addressing. People don’t know exactly what they want, but as one friend of mine put it, they know one thing: FUCK THIS SHIT! We want something different: a different life, with different values, or at least a chance at different values.

(Reblogged from jaybushman)
(Reblogged from mohandasgandhi)